From painters and artists to falconers, archers and a duck decoy broker – learn more about this week’s highlighted Field + Fire talent.

Dick McIntyre

A true native of the South Carolina Lowcountry, Dick resides in Seabrook, SC. He is widely acknowledged as a leading authority on exceptional examples of southern decoys from Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas and offers appraisal services and advice to collectors and buyers.  Dick frequently travels to decoy auctions and shows along the East Coast in a tireless search for the finest examples of the decoy maker’s art.

Janet Mozley

Born in Philadelphia, raised in Atlanta; Janet was born into an artistic family with a long history of producing art in Atlanta. Throughout her life she has felt compelled to create and express herself through visual arts. After attending the Atlanta School of Art for Interior Design, she launched a successful career in interiors during the 70s and 80s. When her family relocated to Hawaii, she was drawn to her natural surroundings and began to paint. Her hobby quickly became a career with several solo exhibitions in Hawaii and the South. She has received accolades from the Atlanta Artists Center, Pastel Journal and selected for the Beaufort Tour of Homes poster. Her work resides regionally in multiple commercial settings including The Inn at Palmetto Bluff. Janet enjoys finding new and creative techniques for expressing her interpretation of the world around her. She works with oils and mixed media paper collages and frequently uses animals as her subject matter.

Karen O’Leary

Karen M. O’Leary is a paper cutting artist and licensed architect located in Charlotte, North Carolina. She aspires to replace the common with something more beautiful. Her art simplifies the classic map image into the Modern Map. A map without text, without clutter, only with intricate paper cutting or repetitive black ink lines. Both processes are simple in style but tedious in execution. Her art resonates her life for architecture and traveling while also capturing the places where we live our lives.

Michael Paderewski

The Sportsman’s Gallery, Ltd. has been a purveyor of fine sporting, wildlife and American art for over 20 years.  The gallery was founded in 1996 by avid outdoor enthusiast, Michael Paderewski. The Atlanta gallery was opened in 1998 and the second location in Beaver Creek, Colorado five years later.  In 2013 the Atlanta gallery was moved to downtown Charleston, where we are presently located at 165 King Street.

The galleries both have a primary focus on the sporting lifestyle, though also include examples of indigenous wildlife, landscapes and fine American art from the 19th century to present.  We strive to meet the needs of patrons of all levels, from those just acquiring the taste for fine artwork to seasoned collectors with specific direction. We pride ourself on customer service and being the best birddog in the field to locate just the right works for each collection.  All works can be viewed on our website and anything seen here can be taken on approval for viewing in your home or office.

James Parker

James’ love of archery began in his childhood at the age of six, as he constructed and shot simple bows made of sticks and strings. From there, his journey in bow-making began. James researched and studied books on the art, history, and skill of building bows. His learning came from books written by J. B Hunt, Jim Hamm, Dr. Charles Greyson, Klopsteg, Adam Korpawitz, and many others.

James has made primitive self-bows (a bow comprised of a single piece of wood) as well as replicas of the bows various Native Americans and other indigenous people used daily. James has replicated nearly every type of Native American bow known to modern man. He has also produced a wide array of arrow types including primitive, medieval, and traditional arrows.

The range of James’ bow-building experience extends from the modern to the ancient. In his repertoire are modern composite recurves and longbows. These are all-wood or wood and fiberglass bows made from bamboo and different laminate materials. On the other end of the spectrum, James’ capabilities include the construction of the bows and weaponry of primitive people from all over the world representing weapons used at various times throughout known history. James’ ancient archery skills reached their apex when he began successfully replicating horn bows. In the past, horn bows were built in many parts of the world, but they were prolifically used by the Chinese, Turks, and the Mongols. The horn bow is a composite bow made of layers of wood, sinew, and water buffalo horn. This exceedingly powerful bow was a war bow and was commonly shot from horseback. It is extremely difficult to master and even more challenging to build. James has built horn bows of the type and quality that were found in China, Hungary, the Middle East, and various parts of Asia.

James’ love and knowledge of archery is not only intellectual; it is also personal and widely used and practiced in his daily life. Not only does James make his own personal bows, but he also makes his arrows of rivercane, which are tipped with his own stone arrowheads. He uses these to hunt and provide for his family of five.

James is familiar with many facets of archery and attempts to further archery education. He has practiced and taught horseback archery (equine archery), which is the shooting of a bow from a running horse. He has instructed bow-fishing classes. He has attended and assisted the set-up of many 3-D archery shoots, utilizing a plethora of stationary targets, moving targets, and aerial targets. He gains much satisfaction from instructing others in the tradition of archery and has a strong desire to keep it alive.

For twenty-two years James has been a member of the North and South Carolina Traditional Archers and would like to recognize Herb Reynolds for his support and knowledge of archery.

Wayne Paulk

Wayne Paulk is the Education Program Coordinator for the Center for Wildlife Education at Georgia Southern University. He graduated from Valdosta State University with a Bachelor of Science in Biology. After graduating, Wayne completed his first bird banding workshop, which only strengthened his interest for all types of birds, especially birds of prey. Wayne has also participated in multiple summer camps, including directing the 2017 Junior Naturalist Summer Camp. Wayne brings both experience and enthusiasm when it comes to educating all age groups about wildlife and the importance of establishing a strong bond between human and nature.

William Rhett

A fifth-generation artist, William is the son of sculptor William Rhett and watercolorist Nancy Ricker Rhett.  At the age of eighteen, in 2002, he suddenly decided that he, too, would paint.  With no formal training, he now paints extensively in oils, watercolors and acrylics.  Anything in nature is his preferred subject. His passion for fishing and hunting gives him a wide panorama of Lowcountry scenes from which to choose – from marshes and beaches, to creeks and woods, wildlife studies and sporting situations – he seems to be equally at home with all of his subject matter. He is best known for his miniatures on antique piano keys. In addition to his artwork, he collects vintage firearms, guitars and antique cars. William exhibits his originals and giclées in his family’s gallery in Beaufort, South Carolina.

Christianna Sanford

Christi became fully immersed in the SC Lowcountry plantation life in 1993, when she married a Beaufort native and moved to Charleston. She has lived, worked and raised two children in Charleston, but spends many weekends at the family farm in Beaufort. At the farm she learned to shoot, fish, boat and many other Lowcountry activities.

Christi was raised in VA with undergrad and graduate degrees from UVA and UNC. She hasworked in various businesses ranging from Brand Management for Hanes tocommunity health outreach. She is also the author of the successful children’s book series “Legare theLowcountry Lizard”.

In the fall of 2014 when her son, Cole, needed a bow tie for an event, and didn’t let her know until the last minute, Christi went to her craft closet and constructed her first feather bow tie using ribbon and pheasant feathers from a recent shoot. The tie was such a hit that she and her son began their business, C Sanford South. Their ties were recently featured as a special “Charleston only“ gift find by Travel and Leisure.

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